Epicurious Recipes & Shopping List

I was so excited about the giveaway last week, I just realized I forgot to do another aphasia-themed review for National Aphasia Awareness Month! No worries–I will make up for it and you will have one for each week this month as promised. 🙂 Since I think cooking is an awesome language activity, I went on the hunt for a recipe app that was cheap, well-organized, and had plenty of visuals. Several met this criteria, but Epicurious was my personal favorite. Play around with a couple options to see what best fits your clients’ needs, but this one is definitely a great place to start.

What It Is: A cooking app with over 30,000 recipes by Epicurious.

Continue reading

Remember the Milk

Woohoo, it’s National Aphasia Awareness Month! Speechie Apps is going to be celebrating and spreading awareness by reviewing an aphasia-related app each week this month. (Also…there will be a fun aphasia-related giveaway coming up in the next couple weeks!) To kick it off, I’m reviewing an app that was suggested to me by an SLP who works in an outpatient rehabilitation setting. Upon hearing the name “Remember the Milk” (RTM), I assumed this was a grocery-list type app. I am so glad I actually took the time to explore it!

What It Is: In a gist, a digitalized to-do list/planner by the company of the same name. There are apps available for Apple, Android, and Blackberry devices.

Continue reading

Toca Tea Party

Toca Tea Party is one of my favorite Toca Boca apps, particularly because it involves a natural social component. I have found that the Toca Boca apps can usually be used in numerous ways. I’ll share some of the ways I’ve used it, and then I’d love for you to share what you’ve done with it!

What It Is: A pretend tea party app by Toca Boca.

Continue reading

Bag Game

Any of you #slpeeps involved in Twitter have probably seen this app touted as “the app that kids can’t play alone.” I was intrigued and, okay, a little skeptical. Thankfully, I downloaded it and was pleasantly surprised. 🙂

What It Is: Developer all4mychild‘s interesting spin on the game of 20 Questions.

Continue reading

My PlayHome

Some research has shown that today’s children are less creative than previous generations, and many point their fingers at the digital era. It makes sense, to an extent. For example, a child who would have once been engaging in imaginative play with action figures and Beanie Babies is now playing with apps and video games. In a large majority of these digital games, imagination is not required; the goal is to win or earn points, and there are only a set number of ways to do so. Thankfully, I don’t think this shift is quite as terrible as some make it out to be. First, common sense parenting (and teaching and therapy) includes knowing how to provide balance–not letting kids play with an iPad every waking minute but realizing that the digital world provides some great opportunities, too. Second, that digital world is actually starting to allow more creativity on the part of the user. My PlayHome is a perfect example.

What It Is: A digital doll house by Shimon Young.

Continue reading

Heroes of the City

What It Is: A collection of interactive stories (and a memory game) by Ruta Ett based on a TV show. Each story is about a different vehicle (police car, seaplane, digger, etc.) and its jobs and daily activities.

Continue reading